• Culture & branding
  • Sky Farming in Progress
  • Sky Farming in Progress
  • Sky Farming in Progress
  • Sky Farming in Progress
  • Sky Farming in Progress
  • Sky Farming in Progress
  • Philips Ladyshave
  • Philips Ladyshave

Culture & branding

Graphic work for an industrial product and even more so for architecture is a relatively young business in essence and spirit. Renewing teams is essential to ensure a constant exchange of new creative ideas which are completely in phase with modernity, fashion and the graphic trends of the moment. A generation of young, talented graphic designers has been working with A3DC in its creation approach to be in phase with current sensitivities, the desires of the moment, various influences and the graphic spirit of the time. In this business there are also trends and fashions, the must-haves and the indispensables. As trends are also graphic: decorations, branding, wording, vocabulary, typography… all follow consistent information. Knowing them, mastering them, knowing how to use them and surfing on their influences are a key force that external contributions from spirited freelancers provide with boundless enthusiasm and relevance with an ongoing renewal process which is always different… giving free expression to a variety of vital personalities and clear-cut characters.

1. Philips International

For the female models of the shavers and epilators which are intended to be the first epilation and body care products bought by Philips consumers, tonic, basic geometric shapes are used in association with primary colours. These are branded products from the Sixteen range which are today displayed in the Industrial Design galleries of the Centre Beaubourg-Georges Pompidou collections in Paris. For the epilator, the Vichy square pattern (in a pink/white and black/white version) takes us on a trip down memory lane to the 60s and pays tribute to the ambassador of Saint Tropez. For the Saintelle BB project, with a codename that speaks for itself, A3DC designed all the creative elements, from the colours of the product to its graphic design, and from the style and trend boards to the packaging. This new dimension to graphic branding has been applied to industrial products since the 90s…

2. DongJak Bridge, Seoul

Korean architecture is known to respect the colour of raw, natural materials. Towns are typical in that they have a striking achromatism. Thus, the columns which act as the stilts of one of the most famous bridges in Seoul across the Han River have always displayed the same grey colour of their concrete. To promote the latest Samsung Galaxy, Cheil Worldwide, the communication agency, asked A3DC to re-colour the town and present this forest of pillars as the Koreans had never seen or imagined them. Using colour which was skilfully applied in architecture in support of a communication campaign for the Korean market, A3DC added all the colours of the spectrum to the characteristic DongJak Bridge of Seoul, which also included the mandatory road markings to ensure that an urban bicycle path was safe.

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4. Calor Epilators & Rowenta spa

As far as Calor is concerned, graphic design is created as an indispensable complement to colour with its most tender, feminine, seductive and caressing aspects. Champagne bubbles, cherry blossom, wave-like patterns… branding is an occasional, ephemeral, charming design… which is intended to bring to life and draw attention to the same products, which are designed to last and thus to be renewed visually by branding. As far as Rowenta is concerned, with the stylised shape of a deciduous bamboo cane, the decoration marks each of the products in the comfort range of Rowenta in a cross-cutting and easily identifiable manner. With a shared identity, the Fitspa massage and reflexology machine, the ergonomic heating pad, the Shiatsu massaging seat… all display this decorative, serene and relaxing pictogram, creating a spirit of collection, a family of complementary and consistent products.

5. Aurys glassmaker

The Aurys glassmaker, which is a French manufacturer of varnished glass, offers a combination of colour and decoration in its range of products. After having requested A3DC to carry out a general overview of European graphic trends, Aurys has included new decorations and graphic designs created by the workshop for the four main uses of its glassware products (kitchen, bathroom, interior decoration and the services environment) in its collections since 2011. Cupboard and wardrobe doors, dressing rooms and partitions are brought to life beautifully. One of the decorations that was designed for Aurys was indeed chosen for the cover page of the Lapeyre 2011/2012 collection… a very good way of asserting the identity and importance of this unit of the Saint-Gobain Glass Solutions branch.

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