• Heritage & protected Sectors
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Ochre historic colour
  • Ochre historic colour
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Time gone-by patina
  • Ochre historic colour
  • Facade colour palette for Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Ochre renewal in Monaco
  • Neoclassicism facade colouring
  • Neoclassicism facade colouring
  • Ochre colouring facades in Burgundy
  • Granite coloured facades in Limoges
  • Art Deco facade colouring in Paris

Heritage & Protected Sectors

In architecture, l’Atelier 3D’s inspiration is enriched by the past history of colour sourced in site samplings and site analysis, through research into historical trends and exploited local resources, with materials found in architectural components and their influence on local atmosphere and luminosity. The natural colours of the stone, sand, bricks and rendering; mineral and organic pigments, wood, slate and tiles are the vocabulary of these gentle and harmonious interventions, blending in with the landscape, respectful of tradition and the history of man. It’s about rediscovering and restoring the fragile local colour, that quality so particular of urban landscapes which gives it all its beauty and rarity.

1. Regional Natural Park of the Oise-Land of France

Regional Natural Park of the Oise-Land of France

Exceeding the work about color made for a single municipality, the mission for a local authority such as a Regional Natural Reserve recovers a vaster and more complex territorial dimension. It indeed gathers an association of scattered and different local authorities the target of which is to associate and convince to combine by the same coherent use of the color. The perception of facades harmonized by every constructed entity, while preserving in every village an identity appropriate peculiar to the inside of a common pallet, is a difficult exercise. The Regional Natural Reserve of the Land of France, in immediate periphery of Paris, straddles the departments of the Oise and Val-d'Oise. In association with the Architecture and Design Office, A3DC, after analyses of sites and grounds, conceived a harmonized and homogeneous pallet of the architecture components for each of the typologies of buildings and for every village, by taking into account local resources, components of the architecture and its materials, the light of spots and views. The natural colors of stones, sands, fillers, mineral and organic pigments, tiles and bricks are the vocabulary of respectful pallets of the landscapes and the architectural tradition, to find and rehabilitate the fragile local color and restore this beautiful and so fragile quality of a typical landscape of Ile-de-France.

2. The principality of Monaco Colour chart consultancy

The principality of Monaco Colour chart consultancy

Monaco on its ‘Rock’ is poised between land and sky in a most enviable position overlooking the Mediterranean. Its architectural heritage can be traced back to the 13th century. Its exceptional panoramic situation requires special attention and understanding with regard to its urban architecture which has retained traces of all the major periods. This amalgamation of styles is at the heart of its historic and patrimonial legacy of which the structural core is mediaeval. Monaco developed throughout the 19th century enhancing itself with examples of all the great architectural movements right up until the real estate boom of the 1960s. The town-planning choices made by Rainier III and the number of high-rise buildings set parallel to the coast line modified the landscape established by the great natural amphitheatre. The department of city planning prepares the architectural development of Monaco, the effects of which will have bearing on the quality of life with aesthetic, economic and touristic repercussions.

3. The town of Salers Protected sector

The town of Salers Protected sector

The richness of the colours of the basalt rock shaped and fashioned by man into building material and roofing for the local architecture. The oxidization of the iron from the volcanic larva has gradually established a traditional colour palette limited to the mineral greys, oxidized reds and Van Dyck browns. The renderings are usually tinted with ochre yellows. The carpentry and woodwork are unique in harmonizing with the building materials and in proposing not only greys but also tawny reds and lighter browns, and the hue of wood has been brightened by yellow oxides, bronze and moss greens and even to emerald greens. The colours of the doors and windows add a personal touch to the buildings.

4. Regional Natural Park of the Chevreuse Valley

Regional Natural Park  of the Chevreuse Valley

The Chevreuse Valley situated thirty kilometres from Paris has retained its natural landscape and an exceptional heritage. The various and diverse constructions include modest rural housing and vast farms as well as many bourgeois manor houses from the 19th and 20th centuries. The residential estates that have been built are a reflection of the increasing urbanisation. The villages of Chevreuse and of Rochefort-en-Yvelines have managed to keep their historic framework and are in a remarkable state of conservation.
The challenges to a colour chart and the materials destined to enhance the estates are evident: retain the coherence and the perception of the landscape and guarantee the valorisation of the original regional heritage.

5. The town of Dunkerque District surrounding the Casino

The town of Dunkerque District surrounding the Casino

The nearby sea, the sound of the breaking waves, the washed out, faded tones of the sand and sea confer on the colour palette of Dunkerque the tones found in watercolours both luminous and subtle; predominately blue accompanied by soft, sunny yellows and the rosy pinks of minerals. The nearness of the seawall gives the area surrounding the Casino and the Place Asseman an ever-changing richness of colour linked to the sea and its shifting light.
A place of to-ing and fro-ing  between the port of Dunkerque and the seaside resort of Malo-les-Bains, the façades of the 1950s and 60s have taken on soft tints, the accent is maritime (greys, sky blues, turquoises…),  or the nuances can be  warmer like the traditional rendering coloured with brick dust and sometimes the joyful colours of the painted brickwork typical of the French Opal Coast.

6. The town of Fort-de-France Colour chart consultancy

The town of Fort-de-France Colour chart consultancy

The colours found in the town of Fort-de-France express the warm tints of the Caribbean. Inspired by tradition and the joyous use of colour the Caribbean is at the crossroads of Indian, African and European civilisations. Mixed in with all these local customs the colour chart consultancy reflects the innate feeling and taste of the inhabitants for marrying festive colours that sing out from all the facades of the town… demonstrating the islanders’ love of life.
Four colour families make way for endless colour harmonies restoring the town to its colourful identity.

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